COCONUT THAI CURRY FRIED RICE

When you look up ‘Thai curry fried rice’ online, the only method you’ll find follows this basic outline: cook the curry paste in the wok with the veg and meat, add cooked rice and toss it all up. Basically a regular fried rice but with Thai curry paste stirred into … Read More »

CHICKEN AND BROCCOLI STIR-FRY

I should probably preface this recipe by saying that I’ve used chilli oil in this dish and I’m afraid it might be an integral component here. Since there are so few ingredients that go into it—oyster sauce, ginger, garlic, soy and chilli oil—I’m not sure it’ll … Read More »

CHILLI OIL

Chilli oil. Third batch in less than a month questions why I don’t have this up here yet. I’ve been meaning to make my own chilli oil for so long now, that when my friend posted her recipe a few weeks ago I took it as a sign and went … Read More »

OVEN-BAKED GOBI MANCHURIAN

My only real grief with gobi manchurian is that it’s fried. Not that I won’t eat it, it’s quite the opposite actually—I love it so much that I’ll eat it, and I’ll want to eat it every time I think about it. Oven-baking makes these a healthier option not to … Read More »

BEETROOT RAITHA WITH COCONUT

When I was photographing this raitha earlier today, my husband came into the room and said “I can’t believe you don’t have this one up yet.” I make this so often during the week, sometimes as a side that we eat alongside rice, and sometimes—I’m a weirdo if you didn’t … Read More »

SPINACH, PANEER & TOMATO PASTA BAKE

I called this an improv pasta bake when I posted it on Instagram a few days ago. That’s because I usually use this combination of sauces—the spinach and paneer sauce, and the tomato sauce—together but in different ways. I’ll explain that confusing statement: for example, I make these stuffed banana … Read More »

OVEN-ROASTED ELEPHANT FOOT YAM

I have recipes on here for oven-roasted sweet potato, taro, and now elephant foot yam. (Slowing inching closer to exhausting all the tuber options available to me.) Potatoes of course do very well in the oven: wedges, fries, baked potatoes, cubed and roasted, whole-roasted baby spuds – your … Read More »

SICHUAN-STYLE NOODLES

By a show of hands, how many of you have looked up a recipe online that ‘serves 4’ (most recipes are written to scale to 4), cooked it, and then realized that there is nowhere close to enough food to feed the 4 people sitting at your table? I’ve been … Read More »

KADHI WITH ‘UNCONSTRUCTED’ PAKORAS

Any recipe that has the word ‘deconstructed’ in it conjures up images of broken tart shells and food that has been meticulously and painstakingly cooked and then taken apart, or that’s been cooked as separate elements and then put together. I get it, and I’ve even tasted some dishes made … Read More »

KHICHDI WITH GREENS

This recipe for khichdi is by no means unconventional, but I took the liberty to change things up a bit using what I found at the local market and what I had on hand. The most obvious one being the addition of greens (and local greens at that). I basically … Read More »

Latest
  • BRUSSELS SPROUTS WITH BACON, DIJON MUSTARD AND PARMESAN

         My love for Dijon mustard runs deep. It was never an acquired taste—I didn’t even know it fell under that category of foods—and I was sold from the first lick of the spoon. Sold to the point where we go through a minimum of one, sometimes two jars a month.… Read More »

  • BARLEY SALAD WITH GREEN MANGO & DRIED SHRIMP

         In the diverse world of whole grains, barley occupies a prime spot. Aside from its stellar, nutrient dense profile, it’s been regarded as one of the best foods to eat for women with PCOS (me) and for women prone to UTIs (also me). I can attest to its remedial … Read More »

  • MALABAR GOAT KURMA

       Before getting to the recipe maybe I should address the glaringly obvious question on your mind: goat?! In common parlance the term mutton is used to denote both sheep and goat meat. I’ll clarify. Mutton and lamb are the meat of domestic sheep. Goat meat is from, well, goats. Goat … Read More »

  • QUINOA WITH ROASTED VEGETABLES + HONEY MUSTARD DRESSING

       Salads that double up as main course are the best kinds of salads. Load it up with vegetables—fresh as well as roasted —lots of herbs and a punchy dressing and Bob’s your uncle, that’s a meal! Use any vegetables you have on hand: root veggies like potatoes, sweet potatoes, beets … Read More »

  • CINNAMON TOAST

       Cinnamon toast—just your everyday bread slathered with butter, cinnamon, and sugar and baked until crunchy, golden, and downright delicious. Since these toasts can be made in bulk, and in advance, they make for a really good breakfast option, an evening snack with coffee or tea, or for just about any … Read More »

  • SALTED CARAMEL PEANUT BUTTER

         First things first, you need a food processor or a high-powered blender to make peanut butter at home. By high-powered I mean a blender that continues to run at full speed without heating up and turning off every 45 seconds. Mine did. EVERY 45 seconds. So making this took about … Read More »

  • HOMEMADE PANEER

      I love making paneer. It makes me feel very competent. It’s one of the easiest—if not, the easiest—cheeses to make which makes it doubly worth it. Simple enough: bring milk to the boil, add acid of some kind (lemon, yogurt or vinegar) and let the curds … Read More »

  • BUTTERFLY PEA FLOWER TEA

        A few years ago, a friend and I did a short stint at a café in Auroville. A café that served wholesome food using local and seasonal ingredients. Popular on the menu were an array of fruit and flower concentrates (which we would serve with plain or soda water) : … Read More »

  • BOK CHOY WITH MISO & GINGER

       The first time I made this dish, I decided to keep the bok choy raw. And the sauce was more like a dressing – the ingredients added to a screw-top jar, shaken, and poured over. It was a bok choy salad of sorts. I knew it was a good pairing—ginger … Read More »

  • BONE BROTH

      I’ve always used the terms stock and broth interchangeably. It was only recently that I learned that while they both have some overlapping similarities and fall under the same premise of using meat, bones (or both), and water, herein lie their differences: stock is typically made with bones and contains … Read More »

  • MILLET BOWLS WITH SPICED LAMB AND AVOCADO

       As someone who’s negatively biased about any dish on the menu that has the word ‘bowl’ in it, this feels slightly hypocritical. Unless it’s soup..and they tell me they serve it in a bowl. Which would make sense. Because how else would you eat soup. I’m talking rice bowls, veggie … Read More »

  • 3-INGREDIENT GRAPE JAM

       Making jam at home is easier than it is made out to be. I’d come across recipes in the past that went into detailed instructions about canning equipment and sterilizing jars..it completely threw me off. You don’t need any heavy-duty ‘canning equipment’ here, and I realized that sterilizing jars is … Read More »

  • TUNA AND CORN SALAD + DIJON DRESSING

        A fresh head of lettuce is a thing of beauty. The iceberg is what my local grocer usually stocks—and this usually suits me just fine for all my salad and sandwich needs—but I was lucky to find some green leaf lettuce, red leaf, and romaine earlier this week. Also, snow … Read More… Read more »

  • THAI CURRY PASTE

       Thai curry pastes usually fall into three main categories based on colour: red, yellow, and green. While the basic set of ingredients—shallots, ginger, garlic, galangal, coriander root, lemongrass, and shrimp paste—remains the same across all three, a few key variations give them their quintessential Thai flavour and colour. Green curry … Read More »

  • MATCHA AND COCONUT OATMEAL

       Matcha seems to fit right into the polarizing foods category – something that’s often described to have an acquired taste for; a love-it or hate-it kind of ingredient. It’s bitter, smells like freshly cut grass, and has the texture of corn flour. Doesn’t sound too appealing, does it? I know, … Read More »