POMEGRANATE MOLASSES

If you’ve been following along on Instagram, you will have noticed that this is my second batch of molasses in the past month. I had no complaints about the first batch except that it yielded a mere ¼ cup of molasses (I got up to a ½ cup thereabouts … Read More »

ROASTED RED PEPPER AND WALNUT PESTO

This recipe is part muhammara (roasted peppers + garlic + walnuts) and part pesto (basil + garlic + Parmesan). A few things that influenced my decision to go down this eclectic route – I wanted something that would keep for a while: seven large peppers would make a bigger batch … Read More »

BANANA OAT PANCAKES + BERRY COMPOTE

  Let’s face it, most recipes that substitute white flour with other options almost always turn out dodgy at best. At least for me they do. Processed-the-heck-out-of flour provides that aerated, light quality that its whole-wheat counterpart or other gluten-free options just cannot seem to compete with. Buckwheat tart shells, … Read More »

PLUM TORTE

This is a plum torte. The plum torte. Not my claim (actually now mine also), but here’s the backstory to its considerable fame. This recipe was originally submitted to the New York Times by Marion Burros in 1983. Every year since then—due to popular demand—the paper re-published the recipe in … Read More »

ROASTED PEARS WITH BLUE CHEESE, WALNUTS & HONEY

Blue cheese, pears, walnuts and honey are a match made in heaven – that’s no revelation. But most recipes that combine these ingredients have other components alongside: lettuce or arugula in a salad, baked into a tart, sprinkled over pizzas, mounded atop crackers. They all taste great, I mean give … Read More »

KOHLRABI AND APPLE SALAD

  Admittedly a boring photograph. In the (hypercritical) eyes of someone trying to make food look as good as it tastes, it falls short. Way short. A herb for contrast would’ve been great for this but nothing worked with the flavours here – mint, basil, coriander, parsley, nothing. My biggest … Read More »

BAKED BEANS (USING BLACK-EYED BEANS)

Hate to break it to you, but baked beans are not baked and black-eyed peas are not peas. Baked beans are made on the stove-top with no baking or oven involved. The name came about because Heinz—one of the oldest and largest manufacturers of tinned baked beans—used to follow a … Read More »

OYSTER MUSHROOM PORIYAL

If oyster mushrooms are hard to come by where you live, button mushrooms are not a great substitute but they will still work. We find oyster mushrooms year round in Coimbatore but unfortunately not in Chennai, so I have, albeit begrudgingly, accepted the button mushroom as a half-decent substitute. As … Read More »

PEANUT, SESAME & COCONUT BALLS WITH JAGGERY

These peanut balls teetered precariously on the edge of turning into peanut butter but the desiccated coconut salvaged them. Not that peanut butter could ever be a bad thing, but I had my mind set on these. Peanuts, when blended, will eventually become peanut butter. These balls follow the same … Read More »

COCONUT FLOUR FROM LEFTOVER PULP

This is a satisfying process: collecting enough coconut pulp—the bi-product or ‘waste’ from squeezing out coconut milk—drying it out (in the sun, no less) and blending it up to make your own flour! I don’t know about you but this is as up my alley as it gets. (Also another … Read More »

Latest
  • BRUSSELS SPROUTS WITH BACON, DIJON MUSTARD AND PARMESAN

         My love for Dijon mustard runs deep. It was never an acquired taste—I didn’t even know it fell under that category of foods—and I was sold from the first lick of the spoon. Sold to the point where we go through a minimum of one, sometimes two jars a month.… Read More »

  • BARLEY SALAD WITH GREEN MANGO & DRIED SHRIMP

         In the diverse world of whole grains, barley occupies a prime spot. Aside from its stellar, nutrient dense profile, it’s been regarded as one of the best foods to eat for women with PCOS (me) and for women prone to UTIs (also me). I can attest to its remedial … Read More »

  • MALABAR GOAT KURMA

       Before getting to the recipe maybe I should address the glaringly obvious question on your mind: goat?! In common parlance the term mutton is used to denote both sheep and goat meat. I’ll clarify. Mutton and lamb are the meat of domestic sheep. Goat meat is from, well, goats. Goat … Read More »

  • QUINOA WITH ROASTED VEGETABLES + HONEY MUSTARD DRESSING

       Salads that double up as main course are the best kinds of salads. Load it up with vegetables—fresh as well as roasted —lots of herbs and a punchy dressing and Bob’s your uncle, that’s a meal! Use any vegetables you have on hand: root veggies like potatoes, sweet potatoes, beets … Read More »

  • CINNAMON TOAST

       Cinnamon toast—just your everyday bread slathered with butter, cinnamon, and sugar and baked until crunchy, golden, and downright delicious. Since these toasts can be made in bulk, and in advance, they make for a really good breakfast option, an evening snack with coffee or tea, or for just about any … Read More »

  • SALTED CARAMEL PEANUT BUTTER

         First things first, you need a food processor or a high-powered blender to make peanut butter at home. By high-powered I mean a blender that continues to run at full speed without heating up and turning off every 45 seconds. Mine did. EVERY 45 seconds. So making this took about … Read More »

  • HOMEMADE PANEER

      I love making paneer. It makes me feel very competent. It’s one of the easiest—if not, the easiest—cheeses to make which makes it doubly worth it. Simple enough: bring milk to the boil, add acid of some kind (lemon, yogurt or vinegar) and let the curds … Read More »

  • BUTTERFLY PEA FLOWER TEA

        A few years ago, a friend and I did a short stint at a café in Auroville. A café that served wholesome food using local and seasonal ingredients. Popular on the menu were an array of fruit and flower concentrates (which we would serve with plain or soda water) : … Read More »

  • BOK CHOY WITH MISO & GINGER

       The first time I made this dish, I decided to keep the bok choy raw. And the sauce was more like a dressing – the ingredients added to a screw-top jar, shaken, and poured over. It was a bok choy salad of sorts. I knew it was a good pairing—ginger … Read More »

  • BONE BROTH

      I’ve always used the terms stock and broth interchangeably. It was only recently that I learned that while they both have some overlapping similarities and fall under the same premise of using meat, bones (or both), and water, herein lie their differences: stock is typically made with bones and contains … Read More »

  • MILLET BOWLS WITH SPICED LAMB AND AVOCADO

       As someone who’s negatively biased about any dish on the menu that has the word ‘bowl’ in it, this feels slightly hypocritical. Unless it’s soup..and they tell me they serve it in a bowl. Which would make sense. Because how else would you eat soup. I’m talking rice bowls, veggie … Read More »

  • 3-INGREDIENT GRAPE JAM

       Making jam at home is easier than it is made out to be. I’d come across recipes in the past that went into detailed instructions about canning equipment and sterilizing jars..it completely threw me off. You don’t need any heavy-duty ‘canning equipment’ here, and I realized that sterilizing jars is … Read More »

  • TUNA AND CORN SALAD + DIJON DRESSING

        A fresh head of lettuce is a thing of beauty. The iceberg is what my local grocer usually stocks—and this usually suits me just fine for all my salad and sandwich needs—but I was lucky to find some green leaf lettuce, red leaf, and romaine earlier this week. Also, snow … Read More… Read more »

  • THAI CURRY PASTE

       Thai curry pastes usually fall into three main categories based on colour: red, yellow, and green. While the basic set of ingredients—shallots, ginger, garlic, galangal, coriander root, lemongrass, and shrimp paste—remains the same across all three, a few key variations give them their quintessential Thai flavour and colour. Green curry … Read More »

  • MATCHA AND COCONUT OATMEAL

       Matcha seems to fit right into the polarizing foods category – something that’s often described to have an acquired taste for; a love-it or hate-it kind of ingredient. It’s bitter, smells like freshly cut grass, and has the texture of corn flour. Doesn’t sound too appealing, does it? I know, … Read More »