RAGI KOOZH (FERMENTED FINGER MILLET AND RICE PORRIDGE)

Finger millet (ragi) porridge has an infamous reputation for being dull, bland, and—especially if you went to my boarding school—a stodgy mass that you’d be forced to eat at breakfast every morning. Although I could always tolerate it, it definitely was not something that I particularly enjoyed eating. Fast forward … Read More »

ASIAN BEEF BURGERS

Sweet and spicy Asian beef burgers? Spicy, sticky Asian beef burgers? Asian beef burgers with a sticky sauce? I basically considered all the possible permutations before settling on ‘Asian beef burgers’. This minimalism thing works for me in completely disjointed ways. I have a confession. I don’t post recipes on … Read More »

COCONUT AND MANGO CHIA PUDDING

We eat eggs for breakfast every single day of the week, which as much as I like, is a bit of a shame because breakfast foods are the most fun to cook in my opinion (albeit not on a busy weekday morning). To get around this, a slightly more elaborate … Read More »

GRANOLA BARS

I know. The world doesn’t need another recipe for granola bars. But I’m here to throw out some ideas and variations to the ones that you normally make, maybe change things up a bit? Specifically this part: dates. Dates are a common enough addition to granola bars for sweetness, but … Read More »

VEGETABLE STOCK FROM KITCHEN SCRAPS

I don’t know if you can tell that I’m quite big on this nose-to-tail / root-to-shoot (?) concept of cooking. Not only is it a great way to reduce waste in the kitchen (and save money), but it also forces me to be creative; think outside the box and utilize … Read More »

PRESERVED LEMON MARINADE

I try to refrain from using words like ‘best’ and ‘favourite’ to describe recipes. But that’s exactly what happened here, and I’ve had to delete two entire paragraphs lest I sound like a used-car salesman. Not a good place to start. Preserved lemons have been making an appearance in a … Read More »

OVEN-ROASTED TARO

Taro/taro root or colocasia as it’s sometimes called is a starchy vegetable of the taro plant. Native to India and South-East Asia, taro also forms a staple in diets in Hawaii, the Caribbean and Africa. Taro ‘root’ is actually the corm—swollen underground stem—of the plant, so technically not a root. … Read More »

VEGAN PESTO

I’m not one for veganizing foods unless I’m cooking for someone who’s lactose intolerant or doesn’t like dairy (happy to report that I haven’t met anyone that falls in the latter category). Having said that, I do however try and reduce my dairy intake for a couple of reasons. One, … Read More »

BRUSSELS SPROUTS PORIYAL

Brussels sprouts in a South-Indian style recipe might sound terribly inauthentic. It is, and it’s probably why it comes as a surprise to most people when I tell them about this poriyal (as well as ones using oyster mushrooms, broccoli and lettuce). Growing up though, this was pretty normal. When … Read More »

BASIC CHINESE CHICKEN STOCK

   When it comes to stock-making, there are no real rules. (I would argue that there are no real rules to cooking in general, but I’ll hold off on that one for now). Depending on whether you’re making a Western style of stock or an Asian one, the ingredients will vary … Read More »

Latest
  • 3-INGREDIENT GRAPE JAM

       Making jam at home is easier than it is made out to be. I’d come across recipes in the past that went into detailed instructions about canning equipment and sterilizing jars..it completely threw me off. You don’t need any heavy-duty ‘canning equipment’ here, and I realized that sterilizing jars is … Read More »

  • TUNA AND CORN SALAD + DIJON DRESSING

        A fresh head of lettuce is a thing of beauty. The iceberg is what my local grocer usually stocks—and this usually suits me just fine for all my salad and sandwich needs—but I was lucky to find some green leaf lettuce, red leaf, and romaine earlier this week. Also, snow … Read More… Read more »

  • THAI CURRY PASTE

       Thai curry pastes usually fall into three main categories based on colour: red, yellow, and green. While the basic set of ingredients—shallots, ginger, garlic, galangal, coriander root, lemongrass, and shrimp paste—remains the same across all three, a few key variations give them their quintessential Thai flavour and colour. Green curry … Read More »

  • MATCHA AND COCONUT OATMEAL

       Matcha seems to fit right into the polarizing foods category – something that’s often described to have an acquired taste for; a love-it or hate-it kind of ingredient. It’s bitter, smells like freshly cut grass, and has the texture of corn flour. Doesn’t sound too appealing, does it? I know, … Read More »

  • SHAKSHUKA WITH ROASTED BANANA PEPPERS

       Back in Uni, eggs for dinner was a standard end-of-the-month staple (as was cereal, but let’s not go there.) Hard-boiled and tossed with dried oregano, salt, and pepper, and piled high on what Nigella calls ‘plastic’ bread – the cheapest kind you can find. Needless to say, I can never … Read More »

  • PRAWN & MANGO GINGER FRITTERS

      I’ve been really looking forward to sharing this recipe with you. It featured in the Diwali edition of Better Homes and Gardens, India last month along with some really innovative dishes from other bloggers. If you haven’t bought a copy yet, the last I checked, it’s still out on stands!… Read More »

  • SPICY HARISSA AND ROASTED VEGETABLE SOUP

      Soups are a great way of getting your veggies in. But you knew that already. But some soups, especially like this one here, can really pack it away. I make this at least once a week—albeit with different variations of vegetables and spices— bung them all on … Read More »

  • SOBA NOODLES + GRILLED PRAWNS + PEANUT BUTTER DRESSING

      I didn’t know what to call this recipe (as you may have noticed). I’ve seen it been called a salad before, but it somehow gives the impression that it is to be eaten alongside something else, a side dish. On the other hand, a noodle dish is almost always in … Read More »

  • HUNG YOGURT WITH ROASTED PLUMS & COCONUT

      Every time I have some extra yogurt that needs using up, hung yogurt is my go-to option. I know it’s something that takes a good few hours of ‘hanging’ time for most of the whey to seep out from it, but it’s a simple enough task to do before bedtime … Read More »

  • KERALAN BEEF FRY

    Completely unrelated to what this post is about but I just have to ask: have you guys heard of aquafaba? It’s the water that beans and legumes like chickpeas have been soaked and/or cooked in (what we end up throwing out), that, did you know, has the miraculous ability to … Read More »

  • LAMB RAGOUT WITH CAULIFLOWER MASH

    My favourite meat of all time is lamb. Having said that, it’s come as a bit of a surprise to me that this is my first lamb dish on here. WHAT. I don’t know how that happened. I made this ragout for Father’s Day a few days ago and had … Read More »

  • DRIED FRUIT AND SEED BARS

      You know by the look of these bars that they are going to be good for you. There’s Medjool dates for sweetness (have you tried these? There are SO good. And sweeeet), freshly ground cinnamon for warmth, squidgy berries, and lots of seeds for my favourite part – the … Read More »

  • LYCHEE, THAI BASIL & GINGER MOJITO

          I was looking for cocktail recipes when I came across something. You know blue curaçao, that lurid blue syrup that bartenders add to drinks? Blue Lagoon, anyone? Turns out, ironically, that it is in fact a kind of orange liqueur from the island country of Curaçao … Read More »

  • TURKISH STUFFED AUBERGINES (IMAM BAYILDI)

       Imam bayildi—literally translated to ‘imam fainted’—is a prominent dish from the Ottoman cuisine. Halved aubergines are roasted and their soft flesh scooped out and mixed with onions, garlic, tomatoes and a heady mix of spices before being stuffed back into their skins and baked. With plenty of olive oil. The … Read More »

  • ROSE SODA

         Have you tried making flower syrups? Context: My friend and I volunteered at the Auroville café for a few weeks in 2015. Aside from their freshly baked goods and wholesome meals made with the freshest produce, they served fruit and flower syrups (mixed with water/soda water) : hibiscus, kumquat, lemon, … Read More »