RAGI KOOZH (FERMENTED FINGER MILLET AND RICE PORRIDGE)

Finger millet (ragi) porridge has an infamous reputation for being dull, bland, and—especially if you went to my boarding school—a stodgy mass that you’d be forced to eat at breakfast every morning. Although I could always tolerate it, it definitely was not something that I particularly enjoyed eating. Fast forward … Read More »

ASIAN BEEF BURGERS

Sweet and spicy Asian beef burgers? Spicy, sticky Asian beef burgers? Asian beef burgers with a sticky sauce? I basically considered all the possible permutations before settling on ‘Asian beef burgers’. This minimalism thing works for me in completely disjointed ways. I have a confession. I don’t post recipes on … Read More »

COCONUT AND MANGO CHIA PUDDING

We eat eggs for breakfast every single day of the week, which as much as I like, is a bit of a shame because breakfast foods are the most fun to cook in my opinion (albeit not on a busy weekday morning). To get around this, a slightly more elaborate … Read More »

GRANOLA BARS

I know. The world doesn’t need another recipe for granola bars. But I’m here to throw out some ideas and variations to the ones that you normally make, maybe change things up a bit? Specifically this part: dates. Dates are a common enough addition to granola bars for sweetness, but … Read More »

VEGETABLE STOCK FROM KITCHEN SCRAPS

I don’t know if you can tell that I’m quite big on this nose-to-tail / root-to-shoot (?) concept of cooking. Not only is it a great way to reduce waste in the kitchen (and save money), but it also forces me to be creative; think outside the box and utilize … Read More »

PRESERVED LEMON MARINADE

I try to refrain from using words like ‘best’ and ‘favourite’ to describe recipes. But that’s exactly what happened here, and I’ve had to delete two entire paragraphs lest I sound like a used-car salesman. Not a good place to start. Preserved lemons have been making an appearance in a … Read More »

OVEN-ROASTED TARO

Taro/taro root or colocasia as it’s sometimes called is a starchy vegetable of the taro plant. Native to India and South-East Asia, taro also forms a staple in diets in Hawaii, the Caribbean and Africa. Taro ‘root’ is actually the corm—swollen underground stem—of the plant, so technically not a root. … Read More »

VEGAN PESTO

I’m not one for veganizing foods unless I’m cooking for someone who’s lactose intolerant or doesn’t like dairy (happy to report that I haven’t met anyone that falls in the latter category). Having said that, I do however try and reduce my dairy intake for a couple of reasons. One, … Read More »

BRUSSELS SPROUTS PORIYAL

Brussels sprouts in a South-Indian style recipe might sound terribly inauthentic. It is, and it’s probably why it comes as a surprise to most people when I tell them about this poriyal (as well as ones using oyster mushrooms, broccoli and lettuce). Growing up though, this was pretty normal. When … Read More »

BASIC CHINESE CHICKEN STOCK

   When it comes to stock-making, there are no real rules. (I would argue that there are no real rules to cooking in general, but I’ll hold off on that one for now). Depending on whether you’re making a Western style of stock or an Asian one, the ingredients will vary … Read More »

Latest
  • PRESERVED LEMONS

       I’d been buying preserved lemons from a store that grows organic lemons on their property. I’m not someone that only buys organic produce, but the concept of using the entire fruit—peel, rind, juice and all—made me want to try and get my hands on some pesticide-free ones for preserving. So … Read More »

  • MISO & COCONUT SOUP WITH SOBA NOODLES AND SILKEN TOFU

       I have a few soba noodle recipes in my repertoire that I cook a lot of and this is the newest, and lately, the most popular addition to that. The original idea was to make it semi-dry—like a pad thai consistency—but the flavours turned out too bold and not in … Read More »

  • TURKISH FRIED EGGS

       The idea of putting yogurt and eggs together may sound unconventional and even slightly eccentric. Yogurt plays an integral part of Turkish cuisine and is used liberally on everything sweet and savoury. It cools a dish down by reducing spice levels, adds acidity and creaminess, and in this case where … Read More »

  • PRAWN AND COCONUT CURRY

       There’s been a slight lull on the blog (and Instagram story-recipe) front at the moment, and it’s got as much to do with procrastination as it does with, hear me out, attempting to eat the same thing every day. For most of the week, I follow a specific “diet” –… Read More »

  • BRUSSELS SPROUTS WITH BACON, DIJON MUSTARD AND PARMESAN

         My love for Dijon mustard runs deep. It was never an acquired taste—I didn’t even know it fell under that category of foods—and I was sold from the first lick of the spoon. Sold to the point where we go through a minimum of one, sometimes two jars a month.… Read More »

  • BARLEY SALAD WITH GREEN MANGO & DRIED SHRIMP

         In the diverse world of whole grains, barley occupies a prime spot. Aside from its stellar, nutrient dense profile, it’s been regarded as one of the best foods to eat for women with PCOS (me) and for women prone to UTIs (also me). I can attest to its remedial … Read More »

  • MALABAR GOAT KURMA

       Before getting to the recipe maybe I should address the glaringly obvious question on your mind: goat?! In common parlance the term mutton is used to denote both sheep and goat meat. I’ll clarify. Mutton and lamb are the meat of domestic sheep. Goat meat is from, well, goats. Goat … Read More »

  • QUINOA WITH ROASTED VEGETABLES + HONEY MUSTARD DRESSING

       Salads that double up as main course are the best kinds of salads. Load it up with vegetables—fresh as well as roasted —lots of herbs and a punchy dressing and Bob’s your uncle, that’s a meal! Use any vegetables you have on hand: root veggies like potatoes, sweet potatoes, beets … Read More »

  • CINNAMON TOAST

       Cinnamon toast—just your everyday bread slathered with butter, cinnamon, and sugar and baked until crunchy, golden, and downright delicious. Since these toasts can be made in bulk, and in advance, they make for a really good breakfast option, an evening snack with coffee or tea, or for just about any … Read More »

  • SALTED CARAMEL PEANUT BUTTER

         First things first, you need a food processor or a high-powered blender to make peanut butter at home. By high-powered I mean a blender that continues to run at full speed without heating up and turning off every 45 seconds. Mine did. EVERY 45 seconds. So making this took about … Read More »

  • HOMEMADE PANEER

      I love making paneer. It makes me feel very competent. It’s one of the easiest—if not, the easiest—cheeses to make which makes it doubly worth it. Simple enough: bring milk to the boil, add acid of some kind (lemon, yogurt or vinegar) and let the curds … Read More »

  • BUTTERFLY PEA FLOWER TEA

        A few years ago, a friend and I did a short stint at a café in Auroville. A café that served wholesome food using local and seasonal ingredients. Popular on the menu were an array of fruit and flower concentrates (which we would serve with plain or soda water) : … Read More »

  • BOK CHOY WITH MISO & GINGER

       The first time I made this dish, I decided to keep the bok choy raw. And the sauce was more like a dressing – the ingredients added to a screw-top jar, shaken, and poured over. It was a bok choy salad of sorts. I knew it was a good pairing—ginger … Read More »

  • BONE BROTH

      I’ve always used the terms stock and broth interchangeably. It was only recently that I learned that while they both have some overlapping similarities and fall under the same premise of using meat, bones (or both), and water, herein lie their differences: stock is typically made with bones and contains … Read More »

  • MILLET BOWLS WITH SPICED LAMB AND AVOCADO

       As someone who’s negatively biased about any dish on the menu that has the word ‘bowl’ in it, this feels slightly hypocritical. Unless it’s soup..and they tell me they serve it in a bowl. Which would make sense. Because how else would you eat soup. I’m talking rice bowls, veggie … Read More »