Horse gram. I like them in salads. I usually don’t like bitter things (and hate matcha for this very reason), but horse gram I can get behind. Also a cool thing about horse gram – it retains its shape better than lentils (even after cooking), so you get a better ‘bite’ without having to undercook them. So, you know, horse gram is cool. That’s the most I’ve said horse gram in such quick succession.

The dressing couldn’t be simpler (or more flavourful): demerara sugar, rice vinegar, garlic, parsley, extra virgin olive oil, pepper, and salt. Shaken together in a jar and poured over the beans whilst still hot so it absorbs all that punchy flavour.

     Until recently I’d never thought to use leeks in this manner. I’d switch up the standard allium of choice, the onion, for a leek sometimes in a risotto or soup base, but never braised and eaten like a vegetable. Since the horse gram is wholesome and robust in texture and character, the leeks bring a sort of delicate flavour to this dish. There is a prominent note of honey in the braising liquid that the leeks sit in making sure the umami quotient is at full throttle on both fronts.

 

 

 

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BRAISED LEEKS WITH HORSE GRAM
Servings
2-3
Ingredients
  • 1/2 cup horse gram (or lentils)
  • 2 large leeks
  • 1/2 cup vegetable stock
  • 1 tbsp honey
  • A small knob of butter
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • Salt, to taste
Dressing:
  • 1 tbsp demerara sugar
  • 1 1/2 tbsp rice vinegar
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 2 tbsp Chopped parsley
  • 1 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • Salt, to taste
Servings
2-3
Ingredients
  • 1/2 cup horse gram (or lentils)
  • 2 large leeks
  • 1/2 cup vegetable stock
  • 1 tbsp honey
  • A small knob of butter
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • Salt, to taste
Dressing:
  • 1 tbsp demerara sugar
  • 1 1/2 tbsp rice vinegar
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 2 tbsp Chopped parsley
  • 1 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • Salt, to taste
Instructions
  1. Add all the dressing ingredients to a screw-top jar and shake until the sugar has fully dissolved. Taste and adjust seasoning.
  2. Add the horse gram to a pot along with 3 cups of water and salt and bring up to a boil. Turn the heat down to a low simmer and cook covered for about 30 minutes. Keep an eye on it after 30 minutes since you want it al dente and not mushy. Once cooked, drain and set aside.
  3. Pour the dressing over the cooked horse gram whilst still hot and toss through. You may need to add more salt at this stage.
  4. Trim and discard the dark green parts of the leeks. Chop off the bottom ends, making sure they still stay intact. Cut into long batons of about 6 inches each, and then halve them lengthwise. Rinse under running water to remove any dirt that may have accumulated inside and pat dry.
  5. Heat butter in a large shallow pan and place the leeks cut side down and cook until lightly browned, about 2-3 minutes.
  6. Flip them around, add the stock and honey, then cover and cook on a low flame for 10-15 minutes until soft (but still holding their shape). Once softened, turn the heat up to its maximum and cook off the remaining stock in the pan.
  7. Plate the leeks with the lentils on top and serve warm.
Recipe Notes

* Adapted from Sprouted Kitchen

 

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